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09-22-18 10:41 PM
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Main - Computers and technology - Should I take programming classes? New reply


LeftyGreenMario
Posted on 09-13-16 04:30 PM Link | #77265
I realize that I have around 6 classes left before I transfer to a 4-year college. I have one class of general ed left and the rest contribute to my major (3D computer animation). But programming classes caught my eye and I wonder if I should try getting into programming now rather than dawdle and look like person who just sits and chats and doesn't contribute here. I don't know how long it takes until I can actually understand how game files work, but I have to start somewhere. I am working on modeling right now, but it's not very... useful... though it does involve Newer U.

I believe Python is easy to begin with, but I also believe it might be beneficial that I be involved in a more controlled study environment rather than trying to learn the thing myself. It helped a lot when I was beginning modeling. They do say that self-help is the best help, but there is simply less of a drive to learn because the pressure simply isn't there and the Internet is chock full of information, useful and useless. Self-teaching can also lead to bad habits that a class will train people to avoid.

My biggest reason to learn programming is that it's... fairly relevant to me and I feel like I'm super dependent on the tools hackers make and I think I can also get my own questions and concerns answered (such as finding foreign file names on a game ISO and wondering how the hell people make programs to convert that stuff) without my sounding like a dork.

But programming isn't super relevant to my major either. My modeling teacher said that the modelers / animators are their own team while the programmers do their share. So learning to program may be an extra burden to me without real payoff since I need to focus on art things like developing my portfolio. And I may not even do programming if I ever develop for games because those two fields are different specialties.

I'm also not really confident myself for making my own decisions, so I like to have other opinions. Unfortunately, I don't trust my own judgement very much. It's my nature. Even after I do some research.

cros107
Posted on 09-13-16 04:47 PM Link | #77266
I don't know, it seems like you should focus on 3D modelling, and self learn programming. Or, maybe, start learning some programming on your own before you make the decision to see if you like it or not. Also, there are plenty of people here who don't do programming, so don't feel like you're being left out, or especially stupid. I know it would likely be more beneficial to start in a controlled environment, but it wouldn't do any harm just learning a bit on your own.

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Yami
Posted on 09-14-16 07:15 AM Link | #77287
No classes, just work on an actual project from day 1, it's really the best way to learn programming.

LeftyGreenMario
Posted on 09-14-16 06:13 PM Link | #77300
Hm, well, I do have Python installed recently and one of the very first tutorial is to make a simple calculator. It feels weird to me that it's all done in a command-prompt-like interface. I wonder when the good stuff is going to happen.

MusiMasta
Posted on 09-14-16 09:11 PM Link | #77329
Codecademy is a pretty good place for starters, you might as well start there. I learned some basic HTML and CSS from there, but now they offer so much there...

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shibboleet
Posted on 09-14-16 09:54 PM Link | #77337
ewe so you're using input() or raw_input (if you're using Py2)



ewe




ewe

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Yami
Posted on 09-15-16 06:53 AM (rev. 3 of 09-15-16 06:54 AM) Link | #77357
Posted by LeftyGreenMario
Hm, well, I do have Python installed recently and one of the very first tutorial is to make a simple calculator. It feels weird to me that it's all done in a command-prompt-like interface. I wonder when the good stuff is going to happen.

If you want to do some GUI stuff with Python, I recommend you to look here:
http://zetcode.com/gui/pyqt5/ or http://zetcode.com/gui/pygtk/

Whether you want to use Qt or GTK, is up to you.
They both work on all modern PC OS's (Linux, Mac, Windows, BSD...), anyway.

StapleButter
Posted on 09-15-16 01:15 PM (rev. 2 of 09-15-16 03:50 PM) Link | #77369
the goal is uniformizing everybody and everything. sheep that are all identical are easier to deal with for the capitalist system, than people who are all different.

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Yami
Posted on 09-15-16 03:24 PM Link | #77382

LeftyGreenMario
Posted on 09-15-16 03:27 PM Link | #77383
Posted by MusiMasta
Codecademy is a pretty good place for starters, you might as well start there. I learned some basic HTML and CSS from there, but now they offer so much there...

Checked it out. Sounds good.

Posted by Yami
If you want to do some GUI stuff with Python, I recommend you to look here:
http://zetcode.com/gui/pyqt5/ or http://zetcode.com/gui/pygtk/

Whether you want to use Qt or GTK, is up to you.
They both work on all modern PC OS's (Linux, Mac, Windows, BSD...), anyway.

Thanks. I'll think about it. I'll have to squeeze time into there, because we share one computer that has Python installed in there. Other computers don't really run .exe files without some parent control in the way.

StapleButter: Wrong thread?

StapleButter
Posted on 09-15-16 03:50 PM Link | #77389
shit.

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Degolegodyl
Posted on 09-15-16 07:35 PM Link | #77427
I find that sure, you can learn programming well online like us people in this thread, theres people that can't learn too well from online "courses" or youtube videos. Depends on how good you are at learning from online.

But for sure, yes, learn programming, in any way, learn python or something basic and then you'll be able to program a lot more. I know that in 3d modelling there are a lot of applications of programming, and honestly, everything benefits from programming knowledge, so whatever method you choose, just pick the one that works best for your learning style.

phase
Posted on 09-18-16 09:38 PM Link | #77613
If you're an absolute beginner, it'll be beneficial to take a course that is structured for learning.

If you know a little bit, such as the basics of Python, then you may want "teach yourself the rest" by reading documentation and tutorials.

I've been sick all weekend, and that's always when I get my best programming done. My brain is too ill to wander off, so I can stay focused on one task. This weekend's task was to learn Crystal. It's Ruby-like language that runs on the LLVM. Since I've taught myself dozens of languages before, one more isn't too monumental. After reading through the docs and the API, I learned enough of the language to just write code, without thinking about the syntax.

I started by learning Java, a horrible approach. If I had formal teaching, I would be far ahead from what I am now. Sadly, they never offered CS classes to middle schoolers.

TheKoopaKingdom
Posted on 09-19-16 04:06 PM Link | #77652
Here, you don't get programming classes until high school, and when you do, it's Java.

Since I'm not there yet, I'm just self-taught in C++ (Technically, my first attempt at learning a language was ARM ASM, which I gave up on. I learned the hard way that assembly is a terrible first language).

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shibboleet
Posted on 09-19-16 08:59 PM Link | #77653
Posted by phase
If you're an absolute beginner, it'll be beneficial to take a course that is structured for learning.

If you know a little bit, such as the basics of Python, then you may want "teach yourself the rest" by reading documentation and tutorials.

I've been sick all weekend, and that's always when I get my best programming done. My brain is too ill to wander off, so I can stay focused on one task. This weekend's task was to learn Crystal. It's Ruby-like language that runs on the LLVM. Since I've taught myself dozens of languages before, one more isn't too monumental. After reading through the docs and the API, I learned enough of the language to just write code, without thinking about the syntax.

I started by learning Java, a horrible approach. If I had formal teaching, I would be far ahead from what I am now. Sadly, they never offered CS classes to middle schoolers.

I'm learning this too, and it amazes me how closely some syntaxes relate to python, such as 1_000 = 1,000

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phase
Posted on 09-20-16 01:32 AM Link | #77660
Posted by MrRean
I'm learning this too, and it amazes me how closely some syntaxes relate to python, such as 1_000 = 1,000

Most modern languages I've seen have adopted this syntax. I think it could be useful for large number, but I've never needed to use any. If I am using large numbers, I usually split it up into factors (2048 = 64 * 32).


Main - Computers and technology - Should I take programming classes? New reply

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