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Main - Serious discussion - Visiting Japan this year: Advice? New reply


CyberTanuki
Posted on 04-10-16 04:42 PM Link | #69645
So, as I stated in a previous post, I have to move out of my apartment unfortunately, because my hours are getting cut at work, but now that I'll be back at home with my parents, I've been really considering something I've dreamed of doing for a decade.

Since I was a boy, one of my biggest desires in life is to visit (possibly live) in Japan, but with being limited as a kid, I could never go there. Ever since I was eight, I've had an incredibly huge interest in their culture and well, basically everything about Japan. When my foreign exchange friend was here, he actually walked me through hiragana and katakana. We dabbed a bit at kanji and actual speech, but ever since he left I've studied more kanji and practiced speaking the language.

Currently, during my moving process, I have officially began saving money for the biggest journey I've thrilled to embark on my entire life. The trip is ways away
(Set for late September through mid October). My buddy from Japan and I are close, so the plan is that I'll be staying with him and helping him out for the 3 weeks while
I'm with him in Nagoya and Tokyo, however if any of you have been there or live there currently, could I have any helpful recommendations?
Any particular sights that I should add on my to-do or anything like that? What should I expect?

Any recommendations is very much appreciated.

StapleButter
Posted on 04-10-16 05:42 PM Link | #69646
don't put visit cards in the back pockets of your pants


other than that, can't really think of anything, other than uh, have fun

____________________
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CyberTanuki
Posted on 04-10-16 07:06 PM Link | #69647
Posted by StapleButter
don't put visit cards in the back pockets of your pants


other than that, can't really think of anything, other than uh, have fun

Thanks for the advice. Haha. :P

LeftyGreenMario
Posted on 04-11-16 10:13 AM Link | #69659
Well, first, do you know anything about Japanese customs? I know only a little, like the emphasis on bowing and how you do that. Shaking hands is fine, though. Also, when denying a request, you don't say "no", you say "It's a little inconvenient right now".

CyberTanuki
Posted on 04-11-16 12:07 PM (rev. 2 of 04-11-16 12:07 PM) Link | #69668
Posted by LeftyGreenMario
Well, first, do you know anything about Japanese customs? I know only a little, like the emphasis on bowing and how you do that. Shaking hands is fine, though. Also, when denying a request, you don't say "no", you say "It's a little inconvenient right now".


I'm aware of their customs, I believe.
"It's a little inconvenient right now"? Interesting. I'm assuming that people in Japan use that rather than just simply "no" because it's more polite? Thank you for letting me know!

Sevrault
Posted on 04-11-16 06:46 PM Link | #69694
Japan is kinda like an opposite of the US.

People actually use their manners and are polite in Japan, from what I hear.

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LeftyGreenMario
Posted on 04-11-16 06:57 PM (rev. 2 of 04-11-16 06:58 PM) Link | #69696
Posted by CyberTanuki
I'm aware of their customs, I believe.
"It's a little inconvenient right now"? Interesting. I'm assuming that people in Japan use that rather than just simply "no" because it's more polite? Thank you for letting me know!

Yeah, "no" is too blunt. You respond with "ちょっと" (chotto), which literally means "a little", but it's also used for denying requests politely.

CyberTanuki
Posted on 04-12-16 02:36 PM Link | #69717
Posted by Sevrault
Japan is kinda like an opposite of the US.

People actually use their manners and are polite in Japan, from what I hear.


Yeah, that's what I've heard as well.

Posted by LeftyGreenMario
Yeah, "no" is too blunt. You respond with "ちょっと" (chotto), which literally means "a little", but it's also used for denying requests politely.


Ah, thanks!

SuperMario64DS
Posted on 04-12-16 07:16 PM (rev. 4 of 04-12-16 07:21 PM) Link | #69729
I'd recommend looking up guides for travelling abroad. Essentially you'll want to know what to do in the event a disaster breaks out in the country you're visiting or back home. There are programs for both instances in which your government will either try to get you home, or the "host" government will arrange for you to stay.

Try not to be a weirdo - Self explanatory. There's a difference between culture and pop culture, so don't get the two confused. 'Culture' would be the people, the way they act, and the way they think. Pop culture would be huge eyes and virtual dancers. If I came to Canada dressed like a Maple Leaf, talked about my pet moose and bragged about my syrup collection you'd think I was a weirdo. My aunt is a native and has no care for these elements of pop culture popularized in the west.

Rule of thumb: Be aware of yourself and what you actually know. Culture does not constitute anime or "manga". You'll look like a dork. If your idea of "culture" includes cherry blossom, "katana", or "a typical schoolgirl", re-evaluate what you're saying when you express your knowledge on the subject. (Not to imply you don't know anything - Some people just work themselves up with the cliche stuff/stuff they think's "cool" and come across as dorks. Hopping to redirect anyone thinking this way)

Lastly, I do not know much about the geographics (Or anything else really, aside from the fact that products of a country do not necessarily represent its people), but the trope is Kyoto is cool looking place, so check it out.

CyberTanuki
Posted on 04-13-16 12:36 AM Link | #69733
Posted by SuperMario64DS
I'd recommend looking up guides for travelling abroad. Essentially you'll want to know what to do in the event a disaster breaks out in the country you're visiting or back home. There are programs for both instances in which your government will either try to get you home, or the "host" government will arrange for you to stay.

I did some research on that, so I think I'll be good on this one.

Posted by SuperMario64DS
Try not to be a weirdo - Self explanatory. There's a difference between culture and pop culture, so don't get the two confused. 'Culture' would be the people, the way they act, and the way they think. Pop culture would be huge eyes and virtual dancers. If I came to Canada dressed like a Maple Leaf, talked about my pet moose and bragged about my syrup collection you'd think I was a weirdo. My aunt is a native and has no care for these elements of pop culture popularized in the west.


I'm not into any thing weird. The only thing I do personally on my free time is collect Nintendo games and vast items, but I wouldn't talk about that constantly or take it to the next level. A brief mention maybe. The last thing I want to do is act like an ignorant weeb. I'll most likely be sharing stories of my North American life and tell them what it's like here in case they are interested.

Posted by SuperMario64DS
Rule of thumb: Be aware of yourself and what you actually know. Culture does not constitute anime or "manga". You'll look like a dork. If your idea of "culture" includes cherry blossom, "katana", or "a typical schoolgirl", re-evaluate what you're saying when you express your knowledge on the subject. (Not to imply you don't know anything - Some people just work themselves up with the cliche stuff/stuff they think's "cool" and come across as dorks. Hopping to redirect anyone thinking this way)


Yeah, implying that all I know is anime/manga of Japan would look very bad. I've looked into Japanese culture in college, and I studied it for quite a while. I'm not incredibly knowledgeable of Japan, but I know what you're saying. It's definitely wise not to open my mouth and make claims of their culture when I may be wrong. If anything, I'd ask a lot of questions. Coming off as a dork is the last thing I'd want to happen for sure.

Posted by SuperMario64DS
Lastly, I do not know much about the geographics (Or anything else really, aside from the fact that products of a country do not necessarily represent its people), but the trope is Kyoto is cool looking place, so check it out.


Thanks for letting me know! Will do!

Yami
Posted on 04-24-16 03:17 AM Link | #69947
My advice is to take cash with you to Japan, because here, cash is still king.
And preferably while still being in your own country, because ATMs don't really like foreign Cards.

ATMs even have opening and closing hours here, which might be inconvenient for you, somehow.
They're usually open from 8:00 until 17:00, and closed entirely during National Holidays.
However, there are some 24/7 ones, but you'll need to find those.
JP Bank, for example, is one of those, although they're still closed during Holidays, and still have limited opening times on Sundays: http://www.jp-bank.japanpost.jp/en/ias/en_ias_index.html

I also recommend you to get an IC Card, which isn't only useful for Public Transportation, it's also useful to buy things in Shops, sometimes.
Not something to really worry about, but if you like paying by NFC, you'll like this as well.

You can refer here, for all of this, and more: http://kbjanderson.com/life-in-japan-where-cash-is-king-or-rather-the-shogun/

StapleButter
Posted on 04-24-16 11:21 AM Link | #69955
regardless of where you go, a tip for NFC payment cards: get a NFC-blocking case to put them in, that will prevent things like people abusing NFC to steal your money, and those cases are fucking cheap

I got one for my student card which is also a NFC payment card, for that reason and also because it interfers with my transportation card which also uses NFC

____________________
NSMBHD - Kafuka - Jul

what do you use to measure bolts? a boltmeter

Yami
Posted on 04-24-16 05:22 PM Link | #69965
The primary use of the NFC Cards I mentioned (IC Cards), is for Public Transportation, and requires to be loaded, anyway.

Besides, here in Japan, you can even leave your Phone and wallet/purse filled with money behind in public while going to the Toilet, and no matter how long you're planning to go away, literally nobody will touch your stuff.
That's one of the many reasons why I went to Japan, if I would do the same thing in the EU, I would have lost my stuff long ago.

CyberTanuki
Posted on 05-02-16 05:33 PM Link | #70293
Posted by Yami
My advice is to take cash with you to Japan, because here, cash is still king.
And preferably while still being in your own country, because ATMs don't really like foreign Cards.

ATMs even have opening and closing hours here, which might be inconvenient for you, somehow.
They're usually open from 8:00 until 17:00, and closed entirely during National Holidays.
However, there are some 24/7 ones, but you'll need to find those.
JP Bank, for example, is one of those, although they're still closed during Holidays, and still have limited opening times on Sundays: http://www.jp-bank.japanpost.jp/en/ias/en_ias_index.html

I also recommend you to get an IC Card, which isn't only useful for Public Transportation, it's also useful to buy things in Shops, sometimes.
Not something to really worry about, but if you like paying by NFC, you'll like this as well.

You can refer here, for all of this, and more: http://kbjanderson.com/life-in-japan-where-cash-is-king-or-rather-the-shogun/


Ah, thank you for letting me know. So when I arrive, should my friend there take me some place to exchange the money for yen? If so, where would I go for that? Do they have places like that inside the airport itself or?

Yami
Posted on 05-02-16 06:11 PM Link | #70294
Well, I exchanged my Euros to Yens before departure, plus most of my money was on my PayPal Account. anyway.
Before I went to Japan, I was no fan of having cash money at all, but I got used to it now.

But you can still try ATMs at 7-Eleven shops, these seem to accept most foreign Bank Cards.

CyberTanuki
Posted on 05-02-16 06:46 PM Link | #70295
Posted by Yami
Well, I exchanged my Euros to Yens before departure, plus most of my money was on my PayPal Account. anyway.
Before I went to Japan, I was no fan of having cash money at all, but I got used to it now.

But you can still try ATMs at 7-Eleven shops, these seem to accept most foreign Bank Cards.


Ah, I see. Thanks for the information. (:


Main - Serious discussion - Visiting Japan this year: Advice? New reply

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